Boston Family

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I'm in Boston today, wiped out but happy after a day of teaching two back-to-back workshops at the fabulous South Boston Yoga.

I taught for nearly five straight hours, and it was glorious. Teachers of all styles were there, alongside beginners, and yogis of all ages and abilities. They breathed together, stuck their tongues out for resounding Lion's Poses, and even laughed freely at my silly jokes. Example:

"Why is the pelvic floor like Elvis? Because it always leaves the building."
(insert groan here).

At the end of class, we sang the following Bon Jovi Chant as one rockin' voice.

(Come into Easy Seat, Hands at chest in Namaste, then fingers interlaced):

Whoa....We're halfway there

Who-oh! Living on a Prayer

Take my hand, We'll make it, I swear,

Who-oh! Living on a prayer

(repeat 3 times, and after the last verse, immediately sing the following line)

Living on a prayer. . .OM.

See it here.

For a moment in time, a bunch of people who were strangers just three hours before were transformed into a kula, or community of the heart. It's something I'll never forget.

Even the studio owners, the immensely knowledgeable David Vendetti and Todd Skoglund, planted themselves in the front row, and practiced next to their students, as students themselves.

Though I was a new presence in the studio, and the SBY students are very loyal to their teachers, they received my instruction with a gung-ho excitement to try something new.

Instead of meeting resistance as a foreign yogi in a new land, I felt like I'd come home to the wild welcome of yoga brothers and sisters I didn't know I had.

Yoga gives us all a chance to find a family of like-minded souls, and to share the experience of moving to and from Center together. When we embrace that family of choice, it enriches our personal yoga journey far more than just going it alone.

As Jon Bon Jovi says, "Take my hand . . . we'll make it, I swear."

To me, Core Strength starts with making a connection to your deepest Self, and from there, developing the courage to offer your truth to others. Receiving their offering of love and respect in return makes the challenges (burning thigh in Warrior 2, anyone?) you endure to get there so completely worth it.

So thanks, Boston Family, for reminding me of that.

Core Question: Where is your yoga family? Tell us how you knew you'd found
a home! Who can you recognize with gratitude for welcoming you as one of their
own?