Comments

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Anne

Two things: Instead of Asteya, wouldn't it be Satya (Truthfulness)
#2, as a teacher, I find that when I get up in front of class my demeanor changes and my voice instantly goes to my "yoga voice". Its very strange. its not a fake voice, but very deliberate. deliberate tone, cadence, words. There are times, when I am feeling tired or not focused that my voice is not as deliberate, but then as class goes on, it becomes more mindful, more deliberate more of my "yoga voice". I have had several compliments about my tone and voice. So I believe it does make a difference.

Anne

Two things: Instead of Asteya, wouldn't it be Satya (Truthfulness)
#2, as a teacher, I find that when I get up in front of class my demeanor changes and my voice instantly goes to my "yoga voice". Its very strange. its not a fake voice, but very deliberate. deliberate tone, cadence, words. There are times, when I am feeling tired or not focused that my voice is not as deliberate, but then as class goes on, it becomes more mindful, more deliberate more of my "yoga voice". I have had several compliments about my tone and voice. So I believe it does make a difference.

Carol

I live and teach in the Highlands of Scotland and was born in Edinburgh and brought up in the suburbs. I then worked for some time, early on, in London with the hearing impaired. Later on, I studied communication. All of this has had an effect on the way I speak. While on a training workshop in Edinburgh, a group of us had our teaching practice evaluated by a visiting teacher from England. Charmed by our 'soft' Scottish accents she said we sounded, amongst other things, 'trustworthy'.

Jennifer

I am a New Zealander who taught classes in Houston Texas and I had to talk much slower and really enunciate by 'r's like in 'fingers'. Otherwise one lady said it sounded like 'fingas' and so everyone would look completely lost in Savasana. And I had to say my name with an american accent (include the R) or people would call me Jenfa or Jemma! I found it quite fun having to change my language slightly to be understood, though many folks in class loved my kiwi accent.

Jenny

I trained with a wonderful teacher whose voice was about an octave lower when she was teaching / interacting with students than it was the rest of the time. It wasn't until I spent time with her socially that I realized she spoke differently outside of the yoga studio. It actually helped me to separate the different aspects of our relationship -- to see her as a peer socially, but as the authority in class.

Wendy

I find it annoying when a teacher uses an affected tone of voice to set a 'yoga mood.' I go to class for instruction and to feel the effects of the asanas, not the mood the teacher is seeking to create with her voice. Clear instruction in any accent is what's good teaching to me. If it's hard to understand a non-native speaker, then one must train our ears and develop patience to hear.

Julia

How sad that students would complain about an instructor's accent. My best yoga experiences as a student came from a German teacher who taught in English. I found it very useful being taught by a non-native English speaker as it meant she could never waffle in class: she didn't fill in the silences with unnecessary words. She chose her words very carefully and also had different ways of expressing and explaining things, perhaps choosing words that a native speaker wouldn't always think to use. It made her instructions fresh and original, and I think therefore we'd listen more carefully. She used her vocabulary very effectively and hence taught with great clarity. It made me think differently about language use in the yoga classroom.

Lara

Barbara- IT is a wonderful idea to include voice training in teacher trainings. I also feel that it is important to know that you can tap into that energy and grow the voice. I have noticed that singing helps cultivate my teaching voice...

Barbara

I had an instructor whose voice was markedly different when she was teaching, from when she was just talking. It's hard to describe her teaching voice, the best I can say is that she "intoned" he words, adding a clarity and resonance that wasn't there the rest of the time. I had the feeling she could be channeling, that old yogis or something divine could be speaking through her when she taught.

My own teaching aspirations are held back partly by the quality of my own voice; I have a hard time projecting, and my voice tends to be rough and gravelly when I speak to a group. I think voice training should be part of teacher training.

Anna

I have a teacher who completely changes her 'regular' voice from her yoga teaching voice and I find it very odd and very distracting. I can't even describe what kind of a voice her 'yoga' voice is, but it seems to be to put herself above all of her students. A separate issue altogether-she never talks to her students-shows up for class, runs thru the routine, and leaves. I only know her 'real' voice from another job she works at-a bookstore.

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