Self-Care Tip: Create a ‘Living’ Kitchen

A living kitchen is a sacred space -- a hearth and a temple where you have the potential to create the nourishment that will serve your own life force.
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A living kitchen is a sacred space -- a hearth and a temple where you have the potential to create the nourishment that will serve your own life force.
give back with love and food, Cooking a healthy soup

A “living” kitchen pulsates with the rhythms of a person’s life. A living kitchen burns brightly when we create a new recipe or taste a pungent extra virgin olive oil. The air in a living kitchen actually tastes good, still spiced from last night’s creation. Plants inhabit this kitchen, breathing moist newness into the nooks and crannies of shelves and cupboards. A wooden cutting board is stained magenta from chopping beets that have brightened the inside of a child’s belly. A living kitchen is a sacred space -- a hearth and a temple where you have the potential to create the nourishment that will serve your own life force.

Here are 6 ways to create a “living” kitchen:

1. Be playful and experiment. Don’t start from the fear that you can’t make yummy food or that it has to be time-consuming.
2. Trust your intuition. Use recipes, but don’t be afraid to put down your measuring spoons and improvise. The ancient Vedic kitchen divas cooked in anjalis, or handfuls. Our grandmas used bushels, dashes, pecks, and pinches.
3. Play some music if you are in a bad mood in the kitchen. It will shift the energy.
4. Be a Creatrix. Make the food beautiful. Serve it on banana leaves. Plant edible flowers in your garden and throw them on your salads and rice dishes.
5. Enlist help. Today’s world requires that all family members help out in the kitchen, and it can be fun!
6. Fall in love first. The reason why you love your mother’s food is because it is made with love, and with the loved one in mind during the process. The bottom line is that your mood goes in the food. If you are angry with your loved ones, stop, breathe, and begin again. If all else fails and you are still upset, put down the knife and order a pizza. Seriously.

Katie Silcox is the author of "Healthy, Happy, Sexy - Ayurveda Wisdom for Modern Women." She's a vinyasa yoga teacher, Ayurvedic practitioner, contributor to Yoga Journal, and a senior teacher within the Sri-Vidya ParaYoga lineage under Yogarupa Rod Stryker. 

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