Print Print Comment Comment Add to Favorites
Log in to save to My Yoga Journal!
Add to Favorites
Bookmark Bookmark

Standing Up to Bad Posture

As many chiropractors and back specialists have discovered, yoga can help improve your posture, and even scoliosis.

By YJ Staff

scoliosis

To correct posture with yoga, the first emphasis should be on poses that help to realign the spine and promote healthy postural habits, according to Elise Browning Miller, coauthor of Life Is a Stretch: Easy Yoga, Anytime, Anywhere. Miller regularly teaches workshops on back care and scoliosis to students, yoga instructors, and the medical community.

"Often with scoliosis you not only lose alignment of the spine from side to side, but also the head can sit forward, one shoulder can be higher, and a hip can be more forward and raised," says Miller. "In addition, you can either develop a less convex curve in the thoracic spine (flat spine) or have too much of a convex curve, which is called kyphosis."

All these symptoms can be improved by doing poses that lengthen the spine, she says, such as Ardha Uttanasana (Right Angle Wall Stretch) and Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog).

"Emphasis should be on keeping the head aligned with the rest of the body. Follow with standing poses that also help you become more aware of postural alignment—Tadasana (Mountain Pose), Vrksasana (Tree Pose), and Trikonasana (Triangle Pose). Again, be conscious of the alignment of your head with the upper body and trunk."

Strengthening the back muscles, particularly the paraspinal muscle that runs vertically along the spine, is also important to improve postural alignment and to keep a scoliosis from progressing more to one side, says Miller. "A good beginning back strengthener (a modification of Salabhasana, or Locust Pose) is to lie on your stomach and raise the right arm and left leg. Repeat with the opposite arm and leg. Hold for 30 seconds on each side and repeat twice.

"To bring a more rounded or convex curve to your spine, I highly recommend Balasana (Child's Pose). Sit on your heels and bend forward with your forehead on the floor. Breathe and relax." Garudhasana (Eagle Pose) is another pose that helps to develop more curve in the thoracic spine, according to Miller. In a standing position, bend your arms in front of you, crossing the right elbow over the left with the palms touching and in alignment with the elbows. Raise the arms up so the elbows are at shoulder height and push the forearms away from the body, making the shoulder blades spread. Repeat, only this time with the left arm in front.

For more information about scoliosis, visit National Scoliosis Foundation's website: scoliosis.org


Print Print Comment Comment Add to Favorites
Log in to save to My Yoga Journal!
Add to Favorites
Bookmark Bookmark
Full Name
Address 1
Address 2
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email (req):

Reader Comments

Aliyu abdullahi

My back is curved making my stomach push forward, and also it makes my buttocks big like a woman.

Theresa

There is confusion here. Posture is not alignment. Posture is subjective (ie, military posture, dance posture, etc), and alignment is subjective (is your knee/hip/shoulder/ear stacked directly over your calcaneus?, is your ASIS and pubic symphisis in the same plane or is one of these bony markers anterior or posterior to the other marker?) come on YJ! Lets get educated about alignment. I say this because in reading the comments, some people who try the poses are getting hurt. If aligned and done with appropriate prep, people should not be hurting themselves. Especially if they are in tune with their edges. But thats another rant.

Theresa Stevens

I have to comment on the postural recommendations given above. Posture is subjective; alignment is objective. To achieve an aligned stance, start from the ground and work up. This article suggest you can achieve an aligned stance from the top down, which is backward. Also, due to hyperkyphosis of nearly EVERYONE's thoracic spine, encouraging MORE thoracic curvature through poses like childs pose could be counterproductive. If you want to see what an aligned stance looks like, read Katy Bowman/Santiago "standing tall in Tadasana", which was published in LA Yoga a couple years ago.

See All Comments »      Add a Comment »

Your Name:

Comment:

Stay Connected with Us!

Join Yoga Journal's Benefits Plus
Liability insurance and benefits to support
teachers and studios.
Learn More
Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 4 FREE GIFTS
Your subscription includes
Yoga for Neck & Shoulders • Yoga Remedies
Yoga for Headaches • Calm, Cool, Collected
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Yoga Journal
and my 4 FREE downloadable Yoga Booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions