Comments

pages: 1

michelle

Hi
Thank you for sharing your knowledge.
Which poses should you avoid if you have a prolapsed uterus?
Can you practice any twist practice?
Do you think leg up the wall pose is good? what about downdog?

Thank you

Mini Suresh

What Asanas can be practiced for Uterus prolapse ?

Ash

Hi, I suffer from navel displacement regularly. I have been told that this is due to weak ligaments that support the intestine. How /What postures can make the ligaments stronger so I dont suffer from this any more ?

Suleima

What asanas can be practiced for irritable bowel syndrome

Andrea

Hi. I am 37 and just had surgery (a hysterectomy and repairs) 7 weeks ago to repair a prolapsed uterus. I am in good health overall except for the prolapse. I want to stay fit and help prevent another prolapse from developing - what types exercises would you recommend.

Christine Kent

With all due respect, Jaki Nett’s understanding of female anatomy and how intraabdominal pressure moves through the body is completely misconceived. There is no “hole” at the bottom of a soft-tissue hammock through which pelvic organs prolapse. Rather, the pelvic outlet is at the back of the body and in normal anatomy the bladder, uterus, and sigmoid colon are carried toward the front of the body directly behind the lower abdominal wall. These organs have fallen back, not down. The concept of trying to move them toward the head is impossible and needs to be abandoned.

Each time we breathe in, the respiratory diaphragm moves all the way down to our last set of ribs. In doing so it pushes everything - the stomach, liver, intestines, bladder and uterus - down and forward. Strong ligaments, called crura, attach the diaphragm to the lumbar vertebrae so that with each breath the lumbar spine is also pulled forward. Over the course of childhood and adolescence the pelvic organs and their channels become biaxial because intraabdominal pressure is constantly being directed at the lower abdominal wall. The Iyengar’s were the first to address pelvic organ prolapse, however, their conceptual framework of female anatomy was misconceived. The exercises described in this article negate what the body is trying to do with every breath we take. Yoga has never understood either the orientation of the human pelvis or the female pelvic organ support system, and continues to teach practices that place women at risk of prolapse. Women the world over are learning to stabilize and reverse the symptoms of prolapse, much of which has been exacerbated by male systems of exercise.

Christine Kent, Whole Woman, Inc.

Christine Kent

With all due respect, Jaki Nett’s understanding of female anatomy and how intraabdominal pressure moves through the body is completely misconceived. There is no “hole” at the bottom of a soft-tissue hammock through which pelvic organs prolapse. Rather, the pelvic outlet is at the back of the body and in normal anatomy the bladder, uterus, and sigmoid colon are carried toward the front of the body directly behind the lower abdominal wall. These organs have fallen back, not down. The concept of trying to move them toward the head is impossible and needs to be abandoned.

Each time we breathe in, the respiratory diaphragm moves all the way down to our last set of ribs. In doing so it pushes everything - the stomach, liver, intestines, bladder and uterus - down and forward. Strong ligaments, called crura, attach the diaphragm to the lumbar vertebrae so that with each breath the lumbar spine is also pulled forward. Over the course of childhood and adolescence the pelvic organs and their channels become biaxial because intraabdominal pressure is constantly being directed at the lower abdominal wall. The Iyengar’s were the first to address pelvic organ prolapse, however, their conceptual framework of female anatomy was misconceived. The exercises described in this article negate what the body is trying to do with every breath we take. Yoga has never understood either the orientation of the human pelvis or the female pelvic organ support system, and continues to teach practices that place women at risk of prolapse. Women the world over are learning to stabilize and reverse the symptoms of prolapse, much of which has been exacerbated by male systems of exercise.

Christine Kent, Whole Woman, Inc.

jeannie

Dear Ms. Nett - thank you for your article on yoga for prolapsed uterus. Please may I ask you - my mother who is 88 probably has a prolapssd uterus. She is usually in a wheel chair though she can stand briefly and walk a few steps. Would you please tell me what yoga exercises she could do in her limited ablity to move. She is in pain and I would like to help Thank you so much Please reply to heidiging1@yahoo.com.

Kathy

I have a yoga student who commented to me that her prolapse seems improved after yoga class. We do several floor postures and elevated leg postures (resting the legs on a folding chair), which may be what is providing some benefit.

Hebah Salem

I have a mild degree of bladder and uterine proloapse, and I noticed after my yoga classes, I feel that I have overstretched or placed too much pressure on my pelvic floor. Is it recommended that I stop yoga? The class I am in focuses on standing poses.

Return to article page

Stay Connected with Us!

Yoga Journal Live events
ep14 YJ LIVE! Colorado
Estes Park, Colorado
Sep 14-21, 2014
Register
florida YJ LIVE! Florida
Hollywood, FL
Nov 13-17, 2014
Register

More Events

Join Yoga Journal's Benefits Plus
Liability insurance and benefits to support
teachers and studios.
Learn More
Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 4 FREE GIFTS
Your subscription includes
Yoga for Neck & Shoulders • Yoga Remedies
Yoga for Headaches • Calm, Cool, Collected
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Yoga Journal
and my 4 FREE downloadable Yoga Booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions