3 Decisions To Make Before Hosting a Yoga Teacher Training

Considering hosting a YTT? Learn from teacher trainer and studio owner Sigrid Matthews' experience. Start with these questions.
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Considering hosting a YTT? Learn from teacher trainer and studio owner Sigrid Matthews' experience. Start with these questions.
yoga teacher training

Are you considering hosting a teacher training at your yoga studio? Learn from teacher trainer and Black Dog Yoga co-owner Sigrid Matthews' experience and start by asking yourself these three questions.

Hosting a yoga teacher training in your yoga studio can be a wonderful way to increase revenue in a passive way and utilize the studio space during slow times of the day. It’s best to make some key business decision upfront to ensure all parties are happy with the experience.

3 Questions To Ask Before Hosting a Yoga Teacher Training

1. Will you be “partnering” with the yoga teacher trainer?

When a yoga studio hosts a teacher trainer, the yoga instructor is usually a well-known teacher who will be attracting a large number of students from all over. While your yoga studio still needs to promote the training to your own student base, the teacher trainer will also be bringing new students into your studio.

Both parties, yoga teacher and studio, will need to agree on terms and conditions upfront, including the split of the total income (e.g., 60% teacher trainer, 40% studio host); whether or not the yoga studio is paying for the teacher’s accommodations (if coming from out of town); the number of hours the training will utilize studio space; cancellation policy and how many students are needed to enroll to make it worthwhile; and a marketing plan.

Your yoga studio has potential to make money if you partner with the teacher trainer, as long as the training has a strong probability of “selling out.” If not, you can be stuck holding the bag of travel expenses and a big deposit if the incoming teacher sets a minimum for what he or she must make without selling out the training.

2. Or will you rent your studio space to the training program?

While you may not pull in big revenue from the flat fee of renting the studio to a teacher trainer, this option takes reduces yoga studio owners' financial risk and lets them off the hook for selling, promoting, and marketing the teacher training. Typically, a yoga studio will set a price for hourly, daily, or weekly rental fees. It’s up to the training program to pay the yoga studio no matter how many students enroll. This means the studio will make the same amount whether the training is small or sold out.

3. Is the teacher training a good fit for your studio?

Even if the yoga studio is not partnering with the training program, the program and the students affiliated will reflect upon your studio. The yoga studio should feel good about the teacher trainer’s reputation, the program quality, and how the training fits into your yoga studio's overall schedule.

It may not be worth it to host an outside teacher training if you have to cancel your regular classes or jeopardize the loyalty of your regular customers. Studio owners want to make sure the regular students, as well as the teacher-training participants, all feel comfortable in the space.

See alsoTeacher Training Debate: Arguments For + Against State Legislation

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ABOUT OUR EXPERT
Sigrid Matthews is the founder of Focused Flow Yoga®—a therapeutic approach to traditional asana designed to create a strong foundation of core support and joint stability. Sigrid leads teacher trainings at Black Dog Studio where she is a teacher and co-owner. Her intention is to encourage personal transformation through mindful, accessible movement.