5 Things All New Yoga Teachers Should Do

Finishing a teacher training can feel both liberating and intimidating. Take these tips from Gigi Yogini as you start your career as a yoga teacher.
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Finishing a teacher training can feel both liberating and intimidating. Take these tips from Gigi Yogini as you start your career as a yoga teacher.
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Finishing a teacher training can feel liberating but intimidating. In order to start your career as a yoga teacher, consider these tips.

Congratulations! You’ve graduated from your yoga teacher training. That's quite an accomplishment. However, now that the training is over, you might be wondering what to do with yourself. Teacher training can be both a great way to explore your yoga practice more deeply and the entry point for anyone who knows they want to start teaching yoga.

Which category do you fall into? Are you excited to begin your journey as a teacher, but unsure where to begin?

5 Tips for New Yoga Teachers

1. Keep practicing.

Now that you’ve deepened your understanding of yoga, continue to explore your personal practice—both at home and by taking classes. There might have been a part of the training (philosophy, pranayama, meditation, asana, etc) that was newer to you or uncomfortable for you. That’s exactly what you should continue to explore. Go deeper and stay curious.

2. Identify your teacher mentors.

The best teachers always remain students. Identify who your mentors are and continue to practice with them. Perhaps they will let you assist them during busy classes or during a workshop. Continue to learn from the person or people who inspire you most. There will always be more to learn about yoga and the teaching lifestyle, especially when it's someone you respect and admire.

3. Get liability insurance.

Every teacher should be professionally protected with insurance, whether you teach once a month or 10 times a week. Yoga Journal offers yoga teachers affordable liability insurance, with special prices for part-time teachers, in order to protect you against the expensive threat of litigation. Theoretically, someone could sue you if they got injured in your yoga class—even if they simply slipped and fell. For this reason, and many more, every yoga teacher should invest in liability insurance.

4. Teach for free.

While you might need to start making some income eventually, sometimes teaching free classes is a great way to build your confidence and community. Try hosting free community classes at a park, workplace, or in your home. Or you look for opportunities to volunteer your skills for communities in need. While you won’t always want to take unpaid opportunities to teach, taking advantage of these opportunities, as you build your confidence and community, can give you valuable experience early in your career.

5. Continue your education.

Never stop learning. Find what makes you excited about yoga and keep pursuing it. Whether you take a retreat, enroll in another mini training, take a workshop, or register for an online course (on a platform like Aim Healthy U), consider becoming an expert in a certain area. You might be interested in a specific style of yoga like Iyengar, Kundalini, or Restorative, or you might want to learn how to work with particular types of students, like veterans, pregnant women, or children.

See also 5 Key Dos + Don’ts for Yoga Teaching Success

Teachers, explore the newly improved TeachersPlus. Protect yourself with liability insurance and build your business with a dozen valuable benefits, including a free teacher profile on our national directory. Plus, find answers to all your questions about teaching.

ABOUT OUR EXPERT
Gigi Yogini teaches yoga in a way that promotes confidence and courage, both on and off the mat. As an advocate for body positivity and healthy body image, Gigi gives women of all ages, shapes, sizes, backgrounds and abilities the tools and resources to love their bodies. In recognition of her work, Gigi has been featured in a variety of magazines and websites including Yoga Journal, Mantra Magazine, LA Yoga Magazine, MindBodyGreen, Elephant Journal, and more. You can connect with her on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.