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Creativity

Feeling Uninspired? Here Are 5 Practices to Stimulate Your Creativity

Clear your mental blocks and get your creative juices flowing with these reinvigorating practices.

As children, creativity likely came easily. We were constantly imagining new ideas, playing make believe, and freely expressing ourselves. Over time though, many of us have lost our connection to that creative instinct.

There’s no question that creativity comes and goes. If you’re someone who creates for a living, this can feel especially frustrating. Some days, I wake up feeling inspired and new ideas come to me naturally and flow with ease. Other times, I feel completely cut off from my creative instincts, and it feels like I can’t think up an original idea no matter how hard I try. These ebbs and flows are a natural part of life—no one is tapped in 100 percent of the time.

It’s important to accept that our “off” days are part of the process, and be gentle with ourselves as we wait for the fog to clear. But there are practices that can help stimulate our creative flow when we are feeling blocked. Our connection to creativity can be fostered and strengthened in a variety of ways, and we can learn to nurture our creative essence that many of us have forgotten.

5 practices to spark your creativity

Practice breathwork

The breath is an incredibly powerful tool for releasing mental blockages and connecting us back to our center. It has the power to clear the mind of the clutter that keeps us feeling disconnected and blocks us from tapping into our creative potential. While deeply immersed in a breathwork practice, our thinking and analytical mind tends to quiet down, allowing for new insights and ideas to come through.

Any variation of a breath practice can be beneficial for tapping back into your creativity, but modalities like transformational breath, holotropic, and Wim Hof can be especially healing and clearing.

Give it a try: The below 10-minute Wim Hof breath practice can help you clear space and connect back to your creative potential.

See also: 5 Breathing Techniques for Stress Management

Morning pages

Coined from the book The Artist’s Way, Julia Cameron came up with morning pages as a daily ritual of free-writing three pages of whatever is crossing your consciousness upon awakening. There is no wrong way to do morning pages—simply write three pages of whatever is coming to mind first thing upon waking up. These pages typically are not artful and may seem like they have nothing to do with creativity, but according to Cameron, morning pages are an exercise in clearing the mind and creating more consciousness and awareness throughout your day, leaving more space for creativity and inspiration. Start implementing morning pages as a part of your daily morning routine to gain the benefits and create space for your creative potential.

See also: Build a Journaling Starter Kit

Lean on herbal remedies

Sometimes when we’re feeling blocked, calling on the help of Mother Nature is the way to go. There are a variety of herbal remedies and natural solutions that assist in stimulating creativity. Lion’s mane is a mushroom with an endless list of physical and mental health benefits, one of which is to enhance mental clarity and creativity. This lion’s mane powder by Om is convenient for every day use and can easily be added to your morning coffee or matcha for a creative boost.

Flower remedies are one of my favorite creative aids. Flower remedies are herbal formulas that use the vibrational qualities of flowers to help clear emotional and physical blockages. Alexis Smart Flower Remedies creates a specific blend for creative blocks and gaining confidence around your creative endeavours called Ganesh. Take four drops four times a day under your tongue to get your creative juices flowing.

Use movement as a creative practice

Movement is a massive part of my creative process. When I am feeling stagnant mentally, there is a good chance that I am feeling the same physically. When trying to move through a creative rut, I make time for a long and mindful walk to shift my energy and let my creativity flow. I find some of the best ideas come when we are least expecting it, and for me that happens when I am deeply present in my body. Getting out of our heads and into the present moment creates space in the mind for new possibilities.

Movement also allows us the opportunity to be present while shifting stuck and stagnant energy stored in the body. When I am feeling blocked, I set an intention around my movement practice for the day to clear space for my creativity to come through. I focus on being completely present in my body and keep a notepad or my phone nearby to record any thoughts or insights that come up while I’m moving.

See also: Want to Better Manage Stress? Get Your Body Moving

Do nothing

Yes that’s right—do nothing. Honoring the ebbs and flows of our creative nature is an important part of the process. When we’re feeling blocked, our first instinct can be to react to this feeling with frustration and panic, when in reality a lot of times we are cut off from our creative nature by being overly busy and stimulated. Sometimes, the best thing we can do when we’re feeling blocked is to completely let go and surrender to that feeling. Giving your body and mind time to fully relax and reset is essential for moving through a creative rut. Let go of trying to force anything, and allow yourself to rest, unplug, and do things that you enjoy.

Be gentle with yourself and fully embrace the current chapter you are in, trusting the cyclical nature of life. In time, your inspiration will return.

See also: How to Move an Idea Through Your Chakras to Realize Your Dharma


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